Homecoming is a tradition Texas Tech participates in (almost) every year. 

Although the Tech website notes the first Homecoming occurred in 1954, stories reported by The Toreador show the tradition started back in 1929.

'20s

Homecoming 1929.jpg

In an excerpt from an article printed on Oct. 23, 1929, the first Homecoming festivities included a football game and dance.

'40s

On Oct. 30, 1948, Homecoming articles report the celebration of the 19th annual Homecoming, along with the football team’s defeat against Rice University at the Homecoming game.

Homecoming 1948

'50s

In 1950, then-Texas senator Lyndon B. Johnson was the headline for Tech's Homecoming festivities. 

Senator Johnson speaks at Tech homecoming

It wasn't until 1954 that the first Homecoming queen tradition started with Suzanne Matteson, a member of Kappa Alpha Theta, being the very first to wear the crown. 

The Toreador printed its homecoming queen winner, NAME, in 1960.

'60s

The Vietnam War stopped the Homecoming tradition for several years. Many men were drafted to fight in the war. 

'70s

On Nov. 15, 1976, the Red Raiders beat Southern Methodist 34-7 but that wasn't the only game that was played at The Jones. A snow storm hit Lubbock earlier that day and canceled the Homecoming parade. 

The football game was delayed over an hour and a half to shovel up six inches of snow, according to The University Daily

Then a giant snowball fight commenced and students and alumni all participated in the all-out rumble. 

'80s

The first Black Homecoming queen, Sharon Moultrie, was crowned in 1981. Moltrie now known as Bruner was an All-American track & field star. On Nov. 9, 1981, a photo of Moultrie being honored appeared on the front page.

Homecoming Queen

Other Homecoming stories included a column encouraging Homecoming to influence students, faculty and alumni alike to take more pride in the university and a sports recap about the Homecoming game against TCU that finished in a tie.

The Homecoming tradition lives on and Red Raiders will continue to tell the story of their experiences. 

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