There’s nothing more soothing than re-watching your favorite childhood Dreamworks or Disney cartoon.

My favorite movie of all time is “Prince of Egypt.” Not only does it have breath-taking visuals and a timeless story, but it did win an Oscar at the 71st Academy Awards for Best Original Song, which “Mulan” wasn’t even nominated for, sorry “Reflection.”

But despite all of the cinematic and musical marvels the makers of “Prince of Egypt” gave us, it’s the memories I associate with the film that make it memorable for me.

There was one summer where my younger sister and I were watching the film together. When the upbeat musical number “Look Through Heaven's Eyes” came on, she and I spontaneously decided to dance around to the music.

It’s the moments like these that make cartoons memorable. Cartoons provide child-like bliss and the happiness that comes from it.

Before Netflix released “Avatar: The Last Airbender”, I finished the series and started watching “The Legend of Korra” on DVD. Yes, I’m still a proud owner of DVDs and VHSs.

As an early 2000’s kid, waiting for the weeknight when the newest episode premiered on cable, re-binge watching this groundbreaking cartoon drought me back to simpler times.

The animation, the character development, the brilliant writing, the plotline and the representation of cultures and disabilities. It was a great show that defined a generation, and I’m so glad I was a part of it.

Early 2000 to 2015 was the prime era of cartoon television. With “Kim Possible,” “Danny Phantom,” “Young Justice,” “Gravity Falls,” “Adventure Time” and other amazing shows, these shows made being a kid so much fun.

Of course, when Netflix started producing its content, we just had to look. Honestly, it did not disappoint. “Voltron: Legendary Defender” united parents and kids alike, and “The Dragon Prince” is a beautiful “Game of Thrones” adventure for kids.

I have fond memories all tied to these shows. When quarantine hit, this is how my family got through the stress. By revisiting the shows, it was like we revisited being a kid again.

And watching some of the shows with my family made it even more special. The inside jokes, running gags and character quirks became like a secret language between my sisters and I.

Several times people would catch us “communicating” this way, and the funny looks they give encouraged us to continue to use the secret language more.

Sometimes, some people understood what we were doing by our sayings and joined in. The friendships that grew from the love of cartoon shows were special, and I treasure them.

I do miss the days of waiting until the 8 p.m. showings and the cliff-hangers certain episodes would end on. I miss the days of watching television with the sole purpose of enjoyment.

I miss the days where my family would gather in the living room and watch our favorite cartoon movies with popcorn and blankets on Friday nights.

But it now gives me an opportunity to appreciate the small things and the time I do get to spend with not just my family but my roommate and newly acquired friends.

I urge you to find your reminder of wholesome nostalgia. It may spark some pleasant memories.

But it now gives me an opportunity to appreciate the small things and the time I do get to spend with not just my family, but my roommate and newly acquired friends.

I urge you to find your own reminder of wholesome nostalgia. It may spark some pleasant memories.  

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